Trends and Drivers of Primary Care Physicians’ Use of #HealthIT

//Trends and Drivers of Primary Care Physicians’ Use of #HealthIT

Trends and Drivers of Primary Care Physicians’ Use of #HealthIT

See on Scoop.it#HealthIT

Commonwealth Fund researchers analyzed data from surveys of primary care physicians conducted in 2009 and 2012 to check on the progress of health IT adoption.

 

 

Adoption of health information technology (HIT) by physician practices rose considerably from 2009 to 2012, yet solo physicians lag practices of 20 or more and certain functions—like electronically exchanging information with other physicians—have been adopted by only a minority of providers. Physicians who are part of an integrated delivery system, share resources with other practices, and are eligible for financial incentives, have higher rates of HIT adoption.

 

 

Doctors are using HIT in greater numbers, spurred on in part by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act of 2009, which provided billions to help build a national HIT infrastructure. Commonwealth Fund researchers analyzed data from surveys of primary care physicians conducted in 2009 and 2012 to check on the progress of HIT adoption and to see how certain factors—like being part of an integrated health system or using shared technical assistance programs—can influence technology take-up.

 Key FindingsFrom 2009 to 2012, the rate of adoption of electronic medical records (EMRs) by U.S. primary care physicians increased by half, from 46 percent to 69 percent. HIT use rose particularly in order entry management: the proportion of physicians able to send prescriptions electronically to pharmacies nearly doubled, from 34 percent to 66 percent; electronic prescribing increased from 40 percent to 64 percent; and electronic ordering of lab tests grew from 38 percent to 54 percent.In 2012, 33 percent of primary care physicians could exchange clinical summaries with other doctors, and 35 percent could share lab or diagnostic tests with doctors outside their practice.As of 2012, a minority of physicians provided electronic access for patients. Roughly one-third or fewer allowed patients to electronically view test results, make appointments, or request prescription refills.Practice size is a major determinant of HIT adoption. Half of physicians in solo practices use EMRs, compared with 90 percent of those in practices of 20 or more physicians.Physicians who are part of an integrated delivery system (like Kaiser Permanente or the Veterans Administration), those who have arrangements with other practices to share resources (technical assistance programs for clinical information systems or quality improvement), and those who are eligible for financial incentives, have higher rates of HIT adoption. 

more at http://www.commonwealthfund.org/Publications/In-the-Literature/2014/Jan/Where-Are-We-on-the-Diffusion-Curve.aspx

 

See on www.commonwealthfund.org

By | 2014-05-21T20:32:51+00:00 May 21st, 2014|Healthcare Marketing Strategy|Comments Off on Trends and Drivers of Primary Care Physicians’ Use of #HealthIT

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